Abdominal muscles

Abdominal muscles

The Rectus Abdominis The most well-known and prominent abdominal muscle is the rectus abdominis.  It is the long, flat muscle that extends vertically between the pubis and the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs. A strong tendinous sheath called the “linea alba,” or white line, divides the rectus abdominis down the middle, and three more horizontal tendinous sheaths give the muscle its familiar “washboard” look in very...

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Core muscles

Core muscles

The muscles of the core run the length of the trunk and torso.     The following list includes the most commonly identified core muscles as well as the lesser known groups:       Rectus Abdominis — located along the front of the abdomen, this is the most well-known abdominal muscle and is often referred to as the “six-pack” due to it’s appearance in fit and thin individuals; Erector Spinae...

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Deltoid muscle

Deltoid muscle

The deltoid muscle is the the triangular muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder, and the outer part of the upper arm, as it passes up and over the shoulder joint. The wide end of the triangle is attached to the shoulder blade (scapula) and the collarbone (clavicle).  The apex of the triangle is attached to the upper arm bone (humerus), about halfway down its length. The deltoid’s strongest point is the central section,...

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Erector spinae muscles

Erector spinae muscles

The Erector spinae muscles (also known as extensor spinae) are a bundle of muscles and tendons, running more or less vertically throughout the lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions of the vertebral column. They are part of a large and complex group of muscles that work together to support the spine, help hold the body upright and allow the trunk of the body to move, twist and bend in many directions. The extensor muscles are attached to the...

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Gluteal muscles

Gluteal muscles

The gluteal muscles (the “glutes”) are the three muscles that make up the buttocks:  the gluteus maximus muscle, gluteus medius muscle and gluteus minimus muscle. The gluteus maximus is the largest of the gluteal muscles and one of the strongest muscles in the human body.  Its action is to extendExtension is a movement of a joint that results in increased angle between two bones or body surfaces at a joint, for example straightening...

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Ground reaction force (GRF)

For maximum power creation in the golf swing, with minimal negative stress on the body, the ground must be the first link in the kinetic chainThe kinetic chain is the different parts of your body acting as a system of chain links to transfer energy from the ground to the golf ball. of energy transfer. Newton’s third law of motion tells us that using the legs to drive forcefully into the ground results in the ground pushing back up into...

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Hip adductor muscles

Hip adductor muscles

The adductor muscles of the hip are a group of muscles of the inner thigh. As the name suggests, the main function of the hip adductors is the adduction of the hip joint – they work to move the thigh inward with the hip bent (the medial movement of the thigh towards the midline of the body in a horizontal plane), and work with the lower fibres of the gluteus maximusThe glutes (gluteal muscles) are the three muscles that make up the...

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Infraspinatus muscle

Infraspinatus muscle

The infraspinatus muscle is a thick, triangular muscle. As one of the four muscles of the rotator cuffThe rotator cuff is a group of muscles and their tendons that act to move and stabilise the shoulder joint., the main function of the infraspinatus is to externally rotateFor your right arm, external rotation means rotating your upper arm clockwise. the arm and stabilise the shoulder joint.       The infraspinatus performs a...

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Internal and External Rotation

In anatomy, internal rotation (also known as medial rotation) is rotation towards the centre of the body. External rotation (or lateral rotation) is rotation away from the centre of the body. Internal and external rotation of the arms (humerus) occurs at the shoulders, causing the elbow to rotate — see Figures 2 and 3.   Figure 1.  Neutral Arm Position (the anatomical position) Figure 2.  Internal Rotation Figure 3. ...

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Kinesiology

Kinesiology, also known as human kinetics, is the scientific study of human movement, performance, and function. Kinesiology applies the sciences of biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, and neuroscience.  It addresses physiological, mechanical, and psychological mechanisms. Applications of kinesiology include biomechanics, orthopaedics, the rehabilitation professions, such as physical and occupational therapy, as well as sport...

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